A Heart’s Revolution by Roseanna M. White



MY REVIEW:

Lark Benton had always loved Emerson Fielding but she was beginning to wonder why he ever asked her to marry him two long years ago. Since then it seemed as if he almost didn’t know she existed except for those rare family occasions when they must see each other. Nevertheless, Lark behaved as she believed Emerson expected of her, all the while wishing he really knew the real Lark. An inappropriate flirtation is the last straw and with the help of her brother Wiley, Lark disappeared to the home of a dear friend of Wiley’s in Annapolis, intending to spend the winter and hopefully miss her own wedding.

It was much too easy to get lost in the pages of “A Heart’s Revolution”. I loved the characters, especially Lark and Emerson and enjoyed seeing how when they finally discovered themselves, they were able to find true love. Other characters played significant roles in the story and at least one other romance played out by its end. At times humorous and often dramatic, the narrative was also filled with post Revolutionary War facts that this history lover enjoyed. I was particularly impressed by one character who repeatedly turned to God despite all the negative circumstances that came against him and whose faith made a lasting impression on both Lark and Emerson.

“A Heart’s Revolution” is another fine novel from one of my favorite authors. If you love historical romance, do yourself a big favor and check out the books of Roseanna M. White.

I voluntarily reviewed a digital copy of this book provided by the author. A favorable review was not required. All views expressed are my own.



ABOUT THE BOOK:

In 1783 peace has been declared, but war still rages in the heart of Lark Benton.

Never did Lark think she’d want to escape Emerson Fielding, the man she’s loved all her life. But when he betrays her, she flees Williamsburg for Annapolis, taking refuge in the nation’s temporary capital. There lark throws herself into a new circle of friends who force her to examine all she believes.

Emerson follows, determined to reclaim his betrothed. Surprised when she refuses to return with him, he realizes that in this new nation he has come to call his own, duty is no longer enough. He must learn to open his heart and soul to something greater—before he loses all he should have been fighting to hold.

Previously published as Love Finds You in Annapolis, Maryland

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Roseanna M. White is a bestselling, Christy Award nominated author who has long claimed that words are the air she breathes. When not writing fiction, she’s homeschooling her two kids, editing, designing book covers, and pretending her house will clean itself. Roseanna is the author of a slew of historical novels that span several continents and thousands of years. Spies and war and mayhem always seem to find their way into her books…to offset her real life, which is blessedly ordinary. You can learn more about her and her stories at www.RoseannaMWhite.com.

 

The Lacemaker by Laura Frantz

The Lacemaker by Laura



MY REVIEW:

I have long been a lover of historical fiction, particularly that with details about the early days of our nation. Laura Frantz is at the top of my list when it comes to colonial history and she may have topped my previous favorites with “The Lacemaker”, a story of colonial Williamsburg, Virginia.

Noble and “Liberty” are names that perfectly describe the primary characters in this tale that details the volatile atmosphere in Williamsburg as conflict between revolutionaries and the British escalated. Frantz provides enough facts to give the reader an understanding of life during that era but the focus is largely on how Noble and Elisabeth (Liberty) were affected by the events surrounding them.

“The Lacemaker” is a story of loyalty, love, and sacrifice that is filled with action and danger. I loved visiting Noble’s plantation with Elisabeth and learning a bit about Welsh customs and food. It was encouraging to watch these characters grow and walk out their faith as they faced extenuating circumstances. I would recommend “The Lacemaker” to all who enjoy historical fiction. Those who usually steer clear of this genre might just find that they like it too.

I voluntarily reviewed a copy of this book provided by Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group. A favorable review was not required. All views expressed are my own.



ABOUT THE BOOK:

It is the eve of a new age of freedom in the colonies.
But can a proper English lady dare hope for her own independence?

Lady Elisabeth “Liberty” Lawson has nearly everything a lady of her position could want. Daughter of the British lieutenant governor of the Virginia Colony and a darling of fine society in a rugged land, she is anticipating an advantageous marriage. That her betrothed is a rake and love is lacking is of little consequence–or so she tells herself.

Though her own life seems in order, colonial Williamsburg is a powder keg on the verge of exploding, and her fiancé’s cousin Noble Rynallt carries the flame of revolution in his heart. Those with connections to the British nobility are suspected as spies, and Liberty soon finds herself left with a terrible choice. Will she stay true to her English roots? Or side with Noble and the radical revolutionaries?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Laura Frantz is a Christy Award finalist and the ECPA bestselling author of several books, including The Frontiersman’s Daughter, Courting Morrow Little, The Colonel’s Lady, The Mistress of Tall Acre, A Moonbow Night, and The Ballantyne Legacy series. She lives and writes in a log cabin in the heart of Kentucky. Learn more at www.laurafrantz.net.